December Book of the Month Poll Winner ~ Topaz Reign by Teresa Richards


Topaz Reign by Teresa Richards
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary, Historical, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full (286 pages)
Age Recommendation: 14+
Rating: Best Book
Review by: Orchid

BoM LASR YA copy

Fairy tales are simply tales, told and re-told, but changed over time. It has been four months since Maggie learned the dark truth behind the tale of the Princess and the Pea and freed Princess Lindy from the cursed Emerald. Lindy is now back in the past where she belongs, queen of her tiny Scandinavian country, and Maggie is a fully reformed ex-stalker. Except … she can’t stop doing internet searches on Lindy and her country. One morning, Maggie wakes to find history turned on its head. Apparently, you can’t destroy a centuries-old curse without consequence. In order to prevent the changes in history from wiping out the present, Maggie resurrects her stalking gene and learns that fairy tales don’t stay dead for long. Or at all. Back in 1623, Lindy is juggling a threat to her family, a handsome new guard she’s not supposed to have feelings for, and a cursed Topaz with ties to the tale of Thumbelina. When past and present collide, Lindy and Maggie are brought together again, and another of Andersen’s tales turns from twisted fiction to chilling fact.

READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE!

Escape from Witchwood Hollow by Jordan Elizabeth


Escape from Witchwood Hollow by Jordan Elizabeth
Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press
Genre: Young Adult, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery, Contemporary, Paranormal, Historical
Length: Full Length (180 pages)
Age Recommendation: 14+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

Everyone in Arnn – a small farming town with more legends than residents – knows the story of Witchwood Hollow: if you venture into the whispering forest, the witch will trap your soul among the shadowed trees.

After losing her parents in a horrific terrorist attack on the Twin Towers, fifteen-year-old Honoria and her older brother escape New York City to Arnn. In the lure of that perpetual darkness, Honoria finds hope, when she should be afraid.

Perhaps the witch can reunite her with her lost parents. Awakening the witch, however, brings more than salvation from mourning, for Honoria discovers a past of missing children and broken promises.

To save the citizens of Arnn from becoming the witch’s next victims, she must find the truth behind the woman’s madness.

How deep into Witchwood Hollow does Honoria dare venture?

Anything can happen when someone gets lost in the woods.

Ms. Elizabeth did an excellent job of blending multiple genres together into one storyline. It was equally a ghost story, a mystery, and a science fiction novel. I honestly couldn’t narrow it down any further than that because of how all of these elements of the plot worked together to show what happened to every character who accidentally or purposefully found themselves in Witchwood Hollow.

While it was incredibly interesting to see how the town of Arnn had changed from one century to the next, I do wish that I’d been able to get to know the characters better than I did. It was confusing to move between three different time periods. Each one of them had a fairly large cast of characters to introduce to the reader, and they all had complicated plots to unravel as well. I met several unique characters in each era, but I felt like I never had the chance to learn more than pretty basic basic information about their personalities and origins. It would have been nice to dive into their lives more deeply.

One of the things I enjoyed the most about this book was how it explored grief. All of the characters had been through some kind of trauma or loss, and all of them were working through the long-term consequences of that. It was fascinating to see how people in different eras thought about their grief and what kinds of coping skills they used to get through it. These scenes were as poignant as they were beautiful.

Escape from Witchwood Hollow should be read by anyone who is in the mood for something thought provoking.

The Girl Before by Cassandra Jamison


The Girl Before by Cassandra Jamison
Publisher: Self Published
Genre: Contemporary, Paranormal, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Short (137 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by: Orchid

Miley has only one year left in the foster system and is sent to finish it in the home of an older couple, Anne and Clive Winchester, who are still coping with the death of their sixteen-year-old daughter. Miley is soon drawn into deadly mind games and deception that make it clear that they have their sights set on more than just replacing their deceased daughter. Hidden secrets within the home and chilling revelations about their past bring Miley’s worst nightmare to life.

Miley Fairchild arrives at her new foster home and immediately feels something is not quite right. The man of the house gives out strict punishment for misdemeanors while the woman seems to be trying to make Miley into the daughter she lost.

Things grow even weirder when she discovers the couple have a son who is never mentioned. He’s on the local police force and seems quite friendly. It’s always difficult to make friends in a new school, but some of the students go out of their way to make things unpleasant.

This book is quite intense and has a really unexpected twist The plot is hidden behind a well written story and as the reader I was never quite sure whether I had worked out what was happening., Every time I thought I’d got it right, something else happened and I wondered if Miley was imagining her trials, but then something proved she wasn’t. Definitely a book to keep me on my toes about what’s going on.

Good book, a little gruesome in parts, but definitely a book that took me into the story and kept my attention.

November Book of the Month Poll Winner ~ E.C. Max, Kid Genius: Critter Camp by Sierra Luke


E.C. Max, Kid Genius: Critter Camp by Sierra Luke
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Middle Grade, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (37 pages)
Age Recommendation: 8+
Rating: 4 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

BoM LASR YA copy

Meet E.C. Max, a lovable know-it-all. He has many misadventures while solving everyday problems using science and technology. His inventions and experiments usually have wacky, unexpected results.

Slap that mosquito as you read how Max deals with pesky pests in E.C. Max, Kid Genius Critter Camp!

READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE!!

Oh Susannah: Things That Go Bump by Carole P. Roman


Oh Susannah: Things That Go Bump by Carole P. Roman
Publisher: Self Published
Genre: Contemporary, suspense
Length: Short Story (44 pages)
Age Recommendation: 8+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by Xeranthemum

Susannah Maya Logan is not having a good day. She doesn’t want to go to her best friend, Lola’s sleepover. Susannah thinks the house is big and spooky, not to mention the ghost that is said to live there. Lola’s big brother, Kai, loves to tease Susannah with scary stories. Throughout her day, she sees people deal with things that scare them. Her sight-impaired friend, Macy, is terrified of unicorns, of all things. She sees a boy at a party who’s frightened of clowns. Her teacher is afraid of getting a cold. Susannah realizes everybody is scared of something. She wishes she was more like Lola, who is not afraid of anything, or so it seems. Susannah discovers people have different ideas of what is scary and what is not, and only they can determine the difference. Join Susannah as she learns to confront her fears and not let her imagination prevent her from having fun.

Adults that remember Alfred Hitchcock’s belief ‘The more left to the imagination, the more the excitement” can also relate it to young children, especially those that are on the verge of awakening to the bigger world and all its linguistic complexities. We take things for granted; our allusions, metaphors and colloquialisms and idioms. Those are big words to explain that what you hear isn’t always what is meant. Susannah, the heroine of Things That Go Bump learns firsthand how scary life can be as her imagination fills in the gaps for things she doesn’t understand, is worried about or is unknown. This little novella reminded me that our tendency to fear those kinds of things don’t necessarily go away just because we ‘grow up’.

I get the impression that Susannah is a lot braver than she gives herself credit for. She questions even when she’s nervous or confused at times, and her best friend’s brother can sometimes be a huge pain in the neck. I think Kai has figured out how much fun it is to tease Susannah because of her reactions. He’s a typical boy who means no harm; he’s just mischievous with a heightened sense of fun that gets carried away now and again. There is a grin worthy payback at some point in the story and I enjoyed that scene.

I really liked Things That Go Bump and I think it’s great for kids to read, or adults to read with their children because it shows and explains how what we take for granted, what we think is ordinary, isn’t so for kids just learning about how the world works, making even simple things big and scary. I enjoyed the ending when Susannah finally faces her fears about sleeping over at Lola’s house and eventually comes to the realization, after a bit of excitement, that everything is going to be alright. The wrap up made me feel good and assured me that Susannah is going to be just fine.

I wish this book had been available when my own kids were younger; I would have absolutely shared it with them. That’s the best recommendation I can give.

October YA Book of the Month Poll Winner ~ Day Moon by Brett Armstrong


Day Moon by Brett Armstrong
Tomorrow’s Edge Book One

Publisher: Clean Reads
Genre: Inspirational, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full (376 pgs)
Age Recommendation: 12+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by Stargazer

BoM LASR YA copy

In A.D. 2039, a prodigious seventeen year old, Elliott, is assigned to work on a global soft-ware initiative his deceased grandfather helped found. Project Alexandria is intended to provide the entire world secure and equal access to all accumulated human knowledge. All forms of print are destroyed in good faith, to ensure everyone has equal footing, and Elliott knows he must soon part with his final treasure: a book of Shakespeare’s complete works gifted him by his grandfather. Before it is destroyed, Elliott notices something is amiss with the book, or rather Project Alexandria. The two do not match, including an extra sonnet titled “Day Moon”. When Elliott investigates, he uncovers far more than he bargained for. There are sinister forces backing Project Alexandria who have no intention of using it for its public purpose. Elliott soon finds himself on the run from federal authorities and facing betrayals and deceit from those closest to him. Following clues left by his grandfather, with agents close at hand, Elliott desperately hopes to find a way to stop Project Alexandria. All of history past and yet to be depend on it.

READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE!

The Ride That Was Really Haunted by Steve Brezenoff


The Ride That Was Really Haunted by Steve Brezenoff
Publisher: Stone Arch Books
Genre: Children’s, Suspense/Mystery, Holiday, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (88 pages)
Age Recommendation: 8+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

The trip to the amusement park should be fun. But when Samantha “Sam” Archer and her friends try out the haunted house ride, things go terribly wrong!

This is a field trip that Samantha isn’t going to forget anytime soon.

The mystery was fun to solve. I liked seeing how quickly the first clue was given to the characters and what they did with it once they realized that something odd was happening on this ride. It was also interesting to watch them try to understand what was happening and figure out if their first guess was correct. Samantha and her friends were smart kids, and it showed in how much time they spent trying to solve the problem of what really happened during the ride.

I would have liked to see more descriptions of what was happening in this story. For example, it would have been nice to know more about what Samantha and her friends saw in the haunted house ride after everything began to go wrong and they realized that they’d have to work together to find a way out of that building. The descriptions of those scenes didn’t contain enough details for me to imagine how they played out.

The dialogue was well done. All of the main characters really sounded like kids, from the silly jokes they made about each other to how they talked about the strange things that were happening when they were trying to figure out what was actually going on in the haunted house. There were a few different times when their conversations made me grin because of how playful they were.

The Ride That Was Really Haunted should be read by anyone who is in the mood for a short, lighthearted mystery.

Day Moon by Brett Armstrong


Day Moon by Brett Armstrong
Tomorrow’s Edge Book One

Publisher: Clean Reads
Genre: Inspirational, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full (376 pgs)
Age Recommendation: 12+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by Stargazer

BoM LASR YA copy

In A.D. 2039, a prodigious seventeen year old, Elliott, is assigned to work on a global soft-ware initiative his deceased grandfather helped found. Project Alexandria is intended to provide the entire world secure and equal access to all accumulated human knowledge. All forms of print are destroyed in good faith, to ensure everyone has equal footing, and Elliott knows he must soon part with his final treasure: a book of Shakespeare’s complete works gifted him by his grandfather. Before it is destroyed, Elliott notices something is amiss with the book, or rather Project Alexandria. The two do not match, including an extra sonnet titled “Day Moon”. When Elliott investigates, he uncovers far more than he bargained for. There are sinister forces backing Project Alexandria who have no intention of using it for its public purpose. Elliott soon finds himself on the run from federal authorities and facing betrayals and deceit from those closest to him. Following clues left by his grandfather, with agents close at hand, Elliott desperately hopes to find a way to stop Project Alexandria. All of history past and yet to be depend on it.

In making the world accessible for everyone-sometimes there are those who manipulate that accessibility to ensure their own motives are achieved.

Day Moon is an extraordinarily written book that follows Elliott, a college student, working on adding written books to Project Alexandria, a computer system designed to make all human knowledge accessible to all throughout the world. Through the course of his work, Elliott begins to notice that an original copy he possesses of Shakespeare’s plays is startlingly different than the electronic copy in Project Alexandria. It is not a huge jump to realize that there are those that would alter human records to reflect a different body of knowledge than one currently possessed.

I love the mystery and suspense surrounding Elliott. The plot unfolds so smoothly and seamlessly that it envelopes the reader in mystery and suspense without the overtones of immediate suspense. The strengthening and breaking of friendships between Elliott and his friends throughout the journey also leads to must suspense and suspicion. In a world where science and electronics have all but pushed out religion, Elliott finds himself looking deeper and deeper inward to understand the various riddles within Project Alexandria.

The dialogue is strong and the descriptions are thorough; in fact, some of the best character interaction involves the look or action rather than words. Brett Armstrong shows a definite understanding and appreciation for human communication, especially when cloaked within suspicion. The story is not overly violent or graphic, but finds the right amount of description and suspense to catch the reader and propel them into the story without going over the top.

The reality behind Day Moon is one that should seriously be considered since the similarities with our own technology and records certainly follow a similar path to the one described within Day Moon. The technological impact within the society and culture of the story could very well be on the horizon for our own society as well. While Day Moon is the first of the Tomorrow’s Edge Trilogy, it ends at a point that leaves the reader desiring to go to the next book, but not feeling unfulfilled as some trilogies do. It stops at a point that is perfect to give the reader an opportunity to pause, catch their breath, and then make the move to pick up the next in the trilogy!

If you are into an enveloping suspense story that shows you what could be with just a hint of human manipulation, I encourage you to pick up a copy of Day Moon!

Seeker by Sarai Henderson


Seeker by Sarai Henderson
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full Length (190 pages)
Age Recommendation: 14+
Rating: 4 stars
Review by Orchid

Six months ago, Hunter’s life turned upside-down. Seeker is dead, a tragedy that’s left Hunter empty and alone. Talon, an agency of superhumans, now looks to her for leadership. When several agents are found dead with mysterious injuries, she has no choice but to track down the killer herself or risk the lives of her teammates and friends. Hunter finds herself in Arizona, where things turn deadly, sending her right into the hands of the one person that could take everything from her—her mother. Forced to do Mother’s bidding, Hunter does the only thing she can … she survives. One grueling day at a time. Will Hunter become the next victim of the killer who has taken so many of her friends’ lives? Will she become the murderous telepath Mother wants her to be? Or will she somehow find a way out of this deadly situation full of so many risks?

Sasha’s code name is Hunter and she’s a telepath. Along with friends like herself she tries to save those who don’t know how to handle their telepathy and psychic abilities. Unfortunately, there are others who want to capture and use the telepaths for experimentation and also use them for illegal ends. Sasha’s psychic sense is prophetic dreams but she wonders if they are telling the past or the future, and if they are what has happened or what might happen.

This is a fascinating story of good and bad, with surprising events popping up when least expected. Well thought out psychic abilities, some I’d never heard of before, piqued the interest and helps the story along. I enjoyed the book although at times the grammatical and spelling errors interrupted the reading flow. I feel the book would benefit from more editing to bring it to a final polished state. Despite this the plot and characters were strong enough to allow me to enjoy the book from beginning to end.

The Hidden Legacy by Christine Rees


The Hidden Legacy by Christine Rees
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Young Adult, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery, Contemporary
Length: Full Length (271 pages)
Age Recommendation: 14+
Heat Level: Sweet
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

The curse of premonition follows Faye Lithyer, forcing her to witness death—over and over again. When Faye moves in with her grandmother in Astoria, Oregon, her visions grow stronger. Faye watches a new friend fall victim to a murder in the not-so-distant future and becomes obsessed with preventing it from happening. However, Faye’s insecurity has her undecided whether she should tell her friend about their impending death or hunt down the murderer before it’s too late. Faye will be faced with an epic choice that threatens to expose her abilities. Will she choose to save her friend from a monster or risk becoming one herself?

Having special powers isn’t always everything it’s cracked up to be.

The dialogue was nicely written. None of the main characters came across to me as particularly talkative people, so it made perfect sense that they usually tended to get straight to the point when they did have something to say. It was a nice, subtle way of showing the audience who these individuals were without ever needing to spell all of it out.

There wasn’t a lot of character development. Faye and her friends seemed to remain more or less the same people regardless of what happened to them. While there were definitely things I admired about these characters, the fact that they didn’t change much over the course of the plot made it harder for me to root for them. It was difficult to understand how someone could go through the experiences they had and not be strongly affected by them.

Faye’s relationship with her grandmother was so sweet. While her grandmother was only in a select number of scenes, it was heart-warming to see such a positive relationship between a grandparent and grandchild. One of my favorite parts of this book happened in the first scene when Faye was warmly welcomed into her grandmother’s home. It was a beautiful introduction to both of these characters, and it only made me want to read more.

One of the other things I found confusing about this tale was how many different characters it followed. The group of friends Faye connected with was just large enough that I sometimes had trouble keeping track of everyone’s backstories and how they all knew each other. While I liked everyone as individuals, I would have enjoyed getting to know a smaller number of them much better rather than learning a little bit about all of them.

With that being said, I did appreciate how well everyone in Faye’s social circle looked out for each other. They genuinely seemed to care about one another, and it showed. This isn’t something I see nearly enough of in the Young Adult genre, so I was pleased to meet a group of friends who were as close as these characters were.

I’d recommend The Hidden Legacy to anyone who has ever felt out of place after moving to a new area or when trying to make some more friends.