Nine Books I Think Every Teenager Should Read by Hugo Driscoll – Guest Blog and Giveaway


This post is part of a virtual book tour organized by Goddess Fish Promotions. One randomly chosen winner via rafflecopter will win a $50 Amazon/BN.com gift card. Click on the tour banner to see the other stops on the tour.

9 Books I Think Every Teenager Should Read

The problems teenagers face was perhaps typified best by the writer Arnold H. Glasow, who ignorantly believed that ‘Telling a teenager the facts of life is like giving a fish a bath.’

Yes, teenagehood is a time where you are too old to be a kid yet too young to be an adult, which often turns it into a period many loathe, and that’s why entertainment is so important. It’s escapism at its best, yet books, which believe it or not, still count as entertainment, are increasingly playing second fiddle to movies and TV shows which is a great shame as there are some fantastic reads out there that chronicle the teenage experience in a way few other mediums manage.

With that in mind, here are nine books that not only inspired me to write Seven Days with You but that I also believe every teenager should read.

1. Norweigan Wood by Haruki Murakami

While the famous Japanese author is primarily known for his works encompassing magical realism, his most famous book of all, a love story about two university students in 1960s Japan turned the author into an overnight sensation in his homeland.

Nostalgically recited in the first person by the male protagonist, Toru Watanabe, the story is one of love and loss and has moments of heart-wrenching sadness that is ubiquitous in most teenage relationships at one point or other. At times it verges on becoming nothing more than an emo love story, but with themes of mental illness, solitude and a sense of the unknown at the heart of its plot, Norweigan Wood manages to pull off the rare feat of being an incredibly well-written page turner.

2. The Secret History by Donna Tartt

If you want a story that explores a rebellion against a system of social norms and conventions, then this book is certainly for you and highly relevant for teens wishing to be something more than a latte-drinking office worker.

Centred around six classics students studying at a ‘fictional’ elite college in Vermont, they collectively adopt a different lifestyle to the social conventions rigorously adhered to in the Western world and instead, live by a particular set of arcane rites. But a murder soon follows, and as the story untangles, readers are left licking their lips as the answers unfold.

3. Wolf in White Van by John Darnielle

Many teenagers go through a period of self-imposed confinement, and the singer-songwriter and author, John Darnielle, explores the effects this has on his 17-year-old protagonist, Sean Phillips.

Left facially disfigured after shooting himself in the head, Sean becomes addicted to a video game, with the writer leaving the reasonings behind the suicide attempt ambiguous until the very end. Emotionally disturbing, but highly relevant in an era where male suicide is the biggest killer in young men, Darnielle’s debut novel is a tour-de-force tale of a teenage experience many are afraid to explore.

4. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz

Done well and gay relationships in literature can make for fascinating reads, especially in areas of the world where same-sex relationships aren’t welcomed. Annie Proulx’s novella Brokeback Mountain, for instance, is an excellent example of how compelling such a story can be, and this story beautifully titled story is no different.

Poetically recited, the story of the relationship between two Mexican-American 15-year-old boys as they struggle to come to terms with their identities and their love for each other is profoundly poignant, particularly at a time where Mexican culture finds it hard to accept America’s more liberal approach to gay relationships.

5. This Boy’s Life by Tobias Wolff

Not every teenager has a rollercoaster life of moving house every year and constantly trying to re-invent themselves in school, but most will probably relate to the constant state of flux the period brings, just like Wolff’s did.
Indeed, as well as divorce, moving from state to state and always arguing with his stepfather, teen readers or those looking back on their teenage years will likely relate to this sometimes-harrowing memoir.

6. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

While the story is now more synonymous with the brilliant movie adaptation starring Emma Watson, the book is also worth a read, especially for those who can relate to the struggles that come with mental health.

Stephen Chobsky also writes with a flair and authenticity that is hard to obtain in many YA works, and his descriptions of a life constantly looked at from the sidelines is likely to be poignant with all ages, not just teens.

7. Looking for Alaska by John Green

John Green’s Edgar Award-winning novel has become somewhat of a cult classic among his millions of devoted teenage readers, and though The Fault In our Stars catapulted Green to literary superstardom, it’s his first novel that is often considered his finest work.

Told in the first person (as is the case with all Green’s works), the book chronicles 15-year-old Miles Halter’s first year at an Alabama boarding school and the love he feels for the uber-cool yet mysterious beauty, Alaska Young. Admittedly, the novel verges off course at times, but as it’s gorgeously written and packed with quotes that will stay with you forever, you’ll find it hard to dislike.

8. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

J.D. Salinger’s 1951 novel about a disillusioned teenage protagonist named Holden Caulfield shifts hundreds of thousands of copies each year and is considered by many as the greatest American novel of all time.
Of course, a 1952 book about teenage fragilities might not have the same impact that other modern books chronicling the teenage experience might have with readers, but it’s still a masterpiece and a book that was ahead of its time.

9. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Consumed by over 65 million readers, the Brazilian author Paulo Coelho’s narrative is one which offers hope to people who believe in the beauty of their dreams. And with a beautifully written spiritual prose, you may just finish the book feeling your life can be whatever you want it to be.

A simple story, but also an empowering one for any teen who fears their life has no direction.

Sean Johnson’s life as a small-town farmhand has been nothing but predictable, but when he meets Sophia Hillingdon at the local animal sanctuary, she gets him out of an eighteen-year rut, away from the mundane existence on the farm, and a grieving, drunken father.

Sophia is the first person who understands him and makes him believe that he might get out of their small town, who tells him, he has the potential to be whoever he wants to be and do whatever he wants to do.

But as their relationship unfolds, it is the most devastating of news that will change both of them forever.

Enjoy an Excerpt

Her face was nearer than it had ever been. Her skin felt smooth and warm. All I could do was lean further into her, losing myself in the moment. And then there were her piercing blue eyes-even more extraordinary up close. Before I knew it, I’d brought my hands to her chest as our parting lips collided. We kissed for hours, inhabiting each other with such force as our bodies rolled across the cooled grass. She was the change I had been searching for. It was the first time I realized; I could be anywhere in the world, but nowhere without her.

About the Author:Hugo Driscoll is a 25-year- old British journalist and content writer for an online publication in London.

When he’s not working, you can usually find him writing in the basements of cafes or lamenting the unfair treatment of millennials in overcrowded London bars.

You can also find Hugo on Twitter, Facebook, and his personal blog, which he updates regularly.

Seven Days with You is his first novel.

Twitter | Facebook | Website

Buy the book at Amazon or Leap of Faith Publishing.

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Comments

  1. Thanks for hosting!

  2. Lisa Brown says:

    Congrats on the tour and thanks for the chance to win 🙂

  3. Astilbe says:

    I haven’t read most of these books yet. I can’t wait to give the rest of them a try, especially Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe.

    7 Days Without You sounds interesting as well. Congratulations on the publication of it.

  4. Victoria says:

    Thanks for sharing, have a great weekend!

  5. I’ve read six of these, not bad!

  6. How long on average does it take you to write a book?

    • Hey, Mai T!

      Before I was working full-time I normally finished a first draft in 2 months but now it takes around 10-12 months.

  7. bernie wallace says:

    What books are you looking forward to read in the near future? Thanks for the giveaway. I hope that I win.

  8. Happy 4th of July!!

  9. bernie wallace says:

    Who was you favorite author growing up? Thanks for hosting the giveaway.

  10. bernie wallace says:

    Have you heard any good jokes recently? Thanks for hosting the giveaway.

  11. Danielle Corrow says:

    this books sounds great! I cant wait to read it!

  12. Nikolina says:

    I really enjoyed reading the guest post, thank you!

  13. Hi, guys! Just to let you know Seven Days with You will now have a new cover and will be self-published after deciding to go separate ways with my publisher.

    More information can be found here

    https://hugodriscollwriting.com/2017/07/05/going-it-alone-seven-days-with-you-will-now-be-self-published/

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