Regen by Cassie Greutman


Regen by Cassie Greutman
Publisher: Greutman Media
Genre: Contemporary, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full length (326 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 3.5 stars
Review by: Orchid

Life is finally shaping up for Trisha. For the first time, she’s with a foster family she doesn’t hate. Her new school is decent, and she even has a boyfriend. Until the night she finds herself waking up in the woods covered in blood, a bullet hole in her dress. Without her fae abilities, she’d be dead, but now the Faerie Council has given her an ultimatum. She has to help find an escaped fugitive, or be taken to Faerie, a place her missing mother told her horror stories about. Now, Trish has to keep her day job a secret from her foster parents, join forces with the ex-boyfriend who killed her, and hunt down a dangerous criminal before he comes into his powers. Should be a piece of cake.

Trisha has been abandoned by her mother and gone through a multitude of foster homes – and she actually likes her latest foster parents. Her dark secret is that she is a fae and part of being fae means she heals really quickly, although now she has been killed. To her surprise she regenerates. I presume this is where the title of the book comes from, although it is not very clear at first.

The book is reasonably written and the story flows well although there are a few unbelievable events when her foster parents read her the riot act, then give in without a murmur. The ending left a lot of loose ends which I found very irritating. The idea is a good one, but it did not go deep enough or follow through on hints about her past which makes it an incomplete story.

I liked the theme of the story, quest to find a criminal; only Trisha can help; several false leads. On the whole, it was pleasant read and quite a good story.

What Time Is It There? by Christine Potter


What Time Is It There? by Christine Potter
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary, Holiday, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full length (167 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by: Orchid

BoM LASR YA copy

Just over a year ago, Bean and Zak headed for colleges two thousand miles apart, promising to write, but to see other people … until Bean fell for the wrong guy and Zak fell off the planet. Now, Bean’s got two weeks’ worth of Zak’s year-old letters that she still can’t bear to open—and a broken heart. Her new best friend, a guy named Amp, wants her to read the letters and be done with it, but he may have his own reasons for that. When Sam shows up at Bean’s school unexpectedly and Bean tumbles into the 19th century from the cellar of a ruined church, things start making a bizarre kind of sense. That is, if she can just fit all the pieces together again…

On the surface Bean seems like an ordinary college girl, but she has a secret. She can travel in time. During her first year in college new events and people make Bean forget the love of her life and now she regrets it. Unfortunately Zak has now disappeared, although she sees him when she travels.

I found this story fascinating. What at first seems to be a straightforward tale of time travel turns out to be far more sinister. I love the way Bean’s friends play a major part in the story, those from her past and the present. From day to day events, to Thanksgiving and Christmas I followed Bean and her friends as they tried to work out where they were going with their lives. Bean has the added problem of where is Zak?

A good story, a little slow at first, but intriguing and fast paced once it gets going.

Neutral Shades by Xondra Day


Neutral Shades by Xondra Day
Publisher: Evernight Publishing
Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (81 pages)
Age Recommendation:16+
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

Forced to move and change schools just before his senior year, Greg Reese thinks his life is over until he meets handsome jock, Nick Anderson who is his dream guy in every way.

Sparks fly between the two, but neither are out. When they’re caught in a compromising situation, Greg quickly finds himself dumped.

Moving on isn’t easy, but starting a summer job helps keep a devastated Greg occupied, along with forming a friendship with humorous and cute co-worker, Chris.

Chris is out and makes no bones about it. Greg has an instant attraction to Chris, and coming out now seems to be an option. After all, you can’t hide forever, right?

It’s never easy to move to a small town. This is even more true for gay teens who don’t know anyone in their new community.

Greg was a three-dimensional protagonist who I came to like quite a bit. His impulsiveness and restlessness sometimes got him into trouble, but it also made him an incredibly interesting guy because of how self-aware he was of his flaws. He was always the kind of person who acknowledged his own weaknesses even if he wasn’t necessarily sure how to improve them. This is the kind of character development that makes me wish for a sequel!

I would have liked to see more details included in this story. Everything from the physical descriptions of the characters to what the buildings they spent their time in looked like were described so briefly that I had a hard time imagining what everyone looked like and what was happening. This was a little disappointing since the plot itself was so well done. Had more time been taken to describe the settings and characters, I would have happily chosen a much higher rating.

The romance was handled beautifully. I loved seeing Chris and Greg get to know each other. They had a lot of shared interested and similar personality traits. It seemed to me like they’d be a great match. The fact that they waited a while before acting on their attractions only made me more curious to find out if the sparks between them were going to lead to anything longterm.

Neutral Shades is a good read for anyone who is looking for something romantic.

Flux by Lucas Pederson


Flux by Lucas Pederson
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary, Paranormal
Length: Full (190 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 3.5 stars
Review by: Orchid

Bullied teenager Addy Decker has had enough of her miserable life. One night, just as she’s about to end it all, a beautiful boy appears in her bathroom, saving her life. At once intrigued and a little scared, she touches the boy and he opens her eyes to a whole different way of life. Addy finds herself in the presence of the Jaunters, a group of people on a mission to magically time travel to the past and save people at risk, as every life saved brings new life to the dead world of the future. Addy is still wrapping her head around it all when her mom is attacked by a Hell Hound. Alongside her new companions, Addy jaunts to save her, but one of them disappears with Addy’s mom to an unknown destination. Now it’s a race against time, in every dimension, to find the rogue Hell Hound, and Addy’s mom, before a plague is unleashed that will infect the fabric of history itself.

This is an unusual book with an involved story about a young girl who is about to take her own life when a boy arrives in her bathroom to stop her. The second time this happens she follows the boy to a place in the future where young people try to stop evil taking over the world and destroying it.

The girl, Addy, is a strange girl, a mixture of her background and the curves life has thrown at her. Intrigued by the future she still longs to go home.

I’m sure the author knew exactly what was happening, but I have to admit I found this story really difficult to follow. Even though I read through to the end I’m still not sure of the point of the story.

I’ve no doubt other readers will find some depth to the book, indeed I hope they do as the actual writing and grammar was excellent.

See by Lee Ann Ward


See by Lee Ann Ward
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full (221 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 4.5 star
Review by: Orchid

Carlie Henson is pretty, popular, and an All-American girl. She has a gorgeous boyfriend and a mother who lives to keep her safe. Probably because everyone is drawn to Carlie…including the murderers she has the ability to identify when she looks in the eyes of their victims. Keeping Carlie’s secret is pretty simple when all she has to do is avoid dead people. But when a cheerleader at her high school is murdered and the killer seems to have gotten away with it, Carlie knows what she has to do. With the help of her boyfriend, Dillon, she devises a plan to see what she must, no matter her personal safety. But when Dillon is the one who’s injured in the showdown with the killer, Carlie vows to never help anyone again…until the next young woman attacked is her best friend, Jenna.

A nice, scary story which had me sitting on the edge of my seat wondering whether Carlie would survive her psychic abilities. How does an almost sixteen year old cope with being able to see a murderers face in the eyes of his victim? Scary enough, but the murderer is also drawn to her by some sort of psychic link.

I liked the way Carlie’s life carried on despite her need to either hide her abilities or put them to good use. Despite telling her boyfriend Dillon she will not lie to him, she does and justifies it by saying it’s for the best, but then has to face the consequences.

The author paints a great character picture of Carlie and Dillon, plus her new friend Jenna. The story has a nice balance between the normal life of a teenager who’s trying to come to terms with her parents divorce, and wanting to help with the nastiness that’s going on around her.

I have to admit, at first I didn’t think I’d like this story, but as I got further into the book it hooked me, making me want to find out what happened next. Good book, satisfying ending and well written.

Eleven Dancing Sisters by Melody Wiklund


Eleven Dancing Sisters by Melody Wiklund
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Historical, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full (218 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Orchid

Erin has a good reason for sneaking into a fae castle: her sisters—princesses of Erdhea—have been secretly visiting it for months, and she just knows they’re in trouble. Unfortunately that’s not an excuse she can give fae lord Desmond when she gets caught. Because Erin is a princess too, and whatever schemes Desmond has, Erin wants no part of them. Instead, she tells him she’s a simple war nurse, and offers no excuse at all.

Desmond can’t have humans wandering in and out of his castle, not when the Fae’s presence in Erdhea must remain hidden. He needs to know how and why Erin sneaked in. But before long, his concerns about Erin are blooming into interest, then fascination, then something else altogether. Under the eye of a lovelorn fae lord, can Erin keep her secrets? Will she even want to?

The eleven dancing sisters are princesses, but in actual fact there are twelve of them. Patience, who now goes by the name of Erin, ran away from home three years ago to be a nurse in the war. On her return nobody recognizes her due to the horrendous burns to her face and body and the lack of one eye.

This is an intriguing story with the princesses going into the fae realm of Lord Desmond Tyraene. Erin has a cloak to make her invisible and follows them.

Erin is a very strong character but the only way I could believe her sisters didn’t recognize her was due to not expecting to see her in the fae realm. I would have thought the way she spoke or moved would have been a clue to her identity. Plus the reason for her sisters to make a bargain with the fae lord was not a forceful enough temptation.

The story was well written with a strong plot but at times my belief was stretched as the story weakened at times before picking up again. I enjoyed the book and would read another by this author as despite the above, it was pleasant to read.

An Unstill Life by Kate Larkindale

An Unstill Life by Kate Larkindale
Publisher: Evernight Teen
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full Length (232 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 5 stars
Review by: Stargazer

When your whole world is falling apart, what are the chances you’ll find love in the most unexpected of places?

Livvie feels like she’s losing everything: her two best friends have abandoned her for their boyfriends, her mother continues to ignore her, while her sister, Jules, is sick again and getting worse by the day. Add in the request Jules has made of her and Livvie feels like she’s losing her mind, too.

Her only escape is in the art room, where she discovers not only a refuge from her life, but also a kindred soul in Bianca, the school “freak”. Livvie’s always felt invisible, at school and at home, but with Bianca, she finally feels like someone sees the real Livvie. As the relationship deepens and it comes time to take the romance public, will Livvie be able to take that step?

Livvie’s about to find out if she has what it takes to make the tough decisions and stand up for herself—for the first time in her life.

How far can you be pushed before you give up your quiet life and take a stand?

An Unstill Life is a deep journey into the life of Livvie, a fifteen-year-old girl with more than her share of life’s problems. Her sister Jules is sick with cancer and Livvie’s mother is preoccupied with the medical diagnosis. Hannah and Mel are Livvie’s two best friends, but boys become the major obstacle and distraction that tears the three apart. Livvie finds herself isolated and overwhelmed with everything going on.

An Unstill Life is a perfect view of how fast everything can spiral out of control. Kate Larkindale balances difficult topics with true to life emotions. The descriptions of events, emotions and reactions that each character has is directly on point and plays out smoothly within the situations presented. Issues of bullying, discrimination and even deep rooted domestic frustrations are cleanly addressed in an honest way.

The story, while told from the point of view of Livvie, really is something that could happen in most families. Events from both home and school are intricately interwoven to provide a great immersive plot that draws the reader in and makes it difficult to put the books down. Each event that piles onto Livvie’s daily life, is reflected in the change to her personality. The author takes great care in showing the transition and shifting of Livvie’s personality throughout the pressure, frustration and difficulties that she endures.

The dialog between characters is strong and flows naturally. Each character has a strong back story that unfolds throughout the story, including the mysterious Bianca. Each secondary character has strong personality development throughout the story as well, showing a depth to the storytelling that Kate exhibits.

If you enjoy an enveloping psychological look at life and how fast things change to shape and mold who we are-make sure you don’t miss An Unstill Life.

The Girl Before by Cassandra Jamison


The Girl Before by Cassandra Jamison
Publisher: Self Published
Genre: Contemporary, Paranormal, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Short (137 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Review by: Orchid

Miley has only one year left in the foster system and is sent to finish it in the home of an older couple, Anne and Clive Winchester, who are still coping with the death of their sixteen-year-old daughter. Miley is soon drawn into deadly mind games and deception that make it clear that they have their sights set on more than just replacing their deceased daughter. Hidden secrets within the home and chilling revelations about their past bring Miley’s worst nightmare to life.

Miley Fairchild arrives at her new foster home and immediately feels something is not quite right. The man of the house gives out strict punishment for misdemeanors while the woman seems to be trying to make Miley into the daughter she lost.

Things grow even weirder when she discovers the couple have a son who is never mentioned. He’s on the local police force and seems quite friendly. It’s always difficult to make friends in a new school, but some of the students go out of their way to make things unpleasant.

This book is quite intense and has a really unexpected twist The plot is hidden behind a well written story and as the reader I was never quite sure whether I had worked out what was happening., Every time I thought I’d got it right, something else happened and I wondered if Miley was imagining her trials, but then something proved she wasn’t. Definitely a book to keep me on my toes about what’s going on.

Good book, a little gruesome in parts, but definitely a book that took me into the story and kept my attention.

She’s Like a Rainbow by Eileen Colucci


She’s Like a Rainbow by Eileen Colucci
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Young Adult, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Historical, Contemporary
Length: Full Length (299 pages)
Age Recommendation: 16+
Heat Level: Sweet
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

“The summer I turned ten, my life took a fairy tale turn.” So begins Reema Ben Ghazi’s tale set in Morocco. Reema awakes one morning to find her skin has changed from whipped cream to dark chocolate. From then on, every few years she undergoes another metamorphosis, her color changing successively to red, yellow and ultimately brown. What is the cause of this strange condition and is there a cure? Does the legend of the White Buffalo have anything to do with it? As Reema struggles to find answers to these questions, she confronts the reactions of the people around her, including her strict and unsympathetic mother, Lalla Jamila; her timid younger sister, Zakia; and her two best friends, Batoul and Khalil. At the same time, she must deal with the trials of adolescence even as her friendship with Khalil turns to first love. One day, in her search for answers, Reema discovers a shocking secret – she may have been adopted at birth. As a result, Reema embarks on a quest to find her birth mother that takes her from twentieth-century Rabat to post-9/11 New York. Reema’s humanity shines through her story, reminding us of all we have in common regardless of our particular cultural heritage. SHE’S LIKE A RAINBOW, which will appeal to Teens as well as Adults, raises intriguing questions about identity and ethnicity.

 

As soon as Reema adjusts to one new skin color, her complexion changes yet again. Will she ever discover why this is happening?

While this book had a large cast of characters, I never had any trouble remembering who was who. I appreciated how much attention Ms. Colucci paid to all of the small details of her characters’ lives. She made them come to life so vividly in my mind that I was able to keep track of everyone even when multiple new people were introduced at the same time.

The pacing was slow. As fascinated as I was by the premise, it was difficult for me to stay interested in the storyline at times because it took so long for the main character to find any clues at all about what was happening to her skin or whether or not she had actually been adopted. It was interesting to read about the ordinary details of her daily routine like what she ate for meals, but there were so many of these scenes that they slowed down the plot and distracted me from the mysteries of this character’s life.

Reema had a complex and difficult relationship with her mother that included a lot of conflict between them as she was growing up. Some of the most memorable scenes were the ones that showed how this relationship evolved as the main character began to make her own decisions in life. I found it intriguing to see how things changed between mother and daughter over the years. Watching Reema attempt to understand why this part of her life was so complicated was one of my favorite parts of this tale.

I’d recommend She’s Like a Rainbow to anyone who is in the mood for something thought provoking.

Finding Nine by Suki Lang


Finding Nine by Suki Lang
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary
Length: Full Length (264 pages)
Age Recommendation:16+
Heat Level: Sensual
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

This is a story of John, a 16 year old who loses his mother to cancer. During the last year of her life she writes a series of eight letters for her son to read after her death. Designed as a treasure hunt, the letters take John to a place his mother left long ago, where he meets a family he knows little of.

The object of the hunt seems to be to find a perfect spot to place his mother’s ashes. But John soon discovers the letters are his mother’s way of helping him move through his grief, and of letting him know she will always be by his side. The journey he takes is about finding hope in the love of two people who welcome him with open arms. And John’s arrival is a gift never expected but long hoped for by two of the people his mother left behind. Through the natural order of things a son is given the opportunity to fulfill a mother’s last wish and to discover her many secrets yet untold.

Sometimes death leaves everyone who loved the deceased with many more questions than they have answers. This is even more true when someone dies before their time.

The descriptions of the places John went and the people he met were nicely written. I especially liked the scenes that showed where his mother had grown up. He knew so little about her childhood that it was wonderful to see how he reacted to all of the pieces of her past he was finally able to to put together.

There were pacing issues. I noticed them the most after John had read the first few letters from his mom and was beginning to dig deeply into what her life had been like before he was born. As interested as I was in the premise of this book when I first began reading it, it was hard for me to pay attention to the plot at times because of how slowly it moved.

Grief is a complicated subject. I was pleased with how Ms. Lang approached all of the different emotions someone can feel when they lose a loved one. John laughed at some of the stories he uncovered about his mom on his journey. In other scenes he felt everything from sorrow to surprise to anger to nostalgia. It was interesting to see how the author explored what happens when someone has so many conflicting feelings about death and grief.

Finding Nine should be read by anyone who has ever needed to grieve the loss of someone they really cared about.