The Day I Became a Bird by Ingrid Chabbert

The Day I Became a Bird by Ingrid Chabbert
Publisher: Kids Can Press
Genre: Childrens, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (40 pages)
Age Recommendation: 6+
Heat Level: Sweet
Rating: 3.5 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

The day he starts school, a young boy falls in love for the very first time. Sylvia sits in front of him at school, and he’s so in love with her, she’s all he can see. But sadly, Sylvia doesn’t see him. In fact, it seems the only thing Sylvia has eyes for is birds. There are birds on her pants and dresses. She wears bird barrettes in her hair. She draws birds on her notebooks and folders. And when she speaks, her voice sounds like birdsong. So in a bold attempt to get Sylvia’s attention, the boy decides to go to school dressed up as a bird. He endures the stares and giggles of his classmates, and a great deal of discomfort, but the boy doesn’t care. Because when it comes to love, sometimes you have no choice but to follow your heart and spread your wings.

In this sweetly funny picture book, Ingrid Chabbert perfectly captures the emotional essence of a child’s first love. The boy’s voice as narrator is realistic and endearing as he engagingly and honestly shares the wonder of his experience. With imagination and gentle humor, Guridi uses spare lines in mostly black and white drawings to tenderly express the poignant heart of the story. This book offers a terrific exploration of young children’s self-discovery and self-expression, as well as the early development of social skills. It makes a wonderful read-aloud to launch a classroom discussion about relationships and feelings.

There’s nothing like feeling a crush for the first time.

I was pleased with how well I got to know the main character even though the narrator never revealed his name. This is a difficult thing to accomplish, especially in a children’s picture book where there often isn’t a ton of room for character development in general. Ms. Chabbert used the time she had wisely, though, and I felt like I knew the main character’s personality really well by the end of his experiment.

The ending was a disappointment. The plot spent so much time building up to what would happen when Sylvia noticed his costume that I was expecting it would keep that energy going through the last scene. When I read the final page, I was surprised by how abruptly it had ended and how little closure I felt about what I’d just read. If not for this issue, I would have chosen a higher rating as I loved the beginning and middle of it.

One of the things that first attracted me to this tale was how the main character was going to go through an ordinary school day while wearing such a bulky costume. There were all sorts of practical questions I had about how a kid would do everything from spend his time at recess to react to bad weather while wearing a bird costume. I liked the fact that the narrator spent so much time showing how this all worked once the boy was at school and didn’t have his parents or other relatives around to help him.

The Day I Became a Bird was a heartwarming look at a child’s first crush.

My New Mom & Me by Renata Galindo


My New Mom and Me by Renata Galindo
Publisher: Schwartz and Wade
Genre: Childrens, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (34 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

A heartwarming “tail” about adoption, diversity, and acceptance that’s perfect for young readers!

Told from the point of view of a puppy who is adopted by a cat, this gentle and reassuring tale is perfect for very young readers and listeners.

When the puppy comes to live with his new mom, he is nervous. After all, his mom has stripes and he doesn’t. But his mom says she likes that they look different, and soon the puppy likes it, too. (And who cares what anyone else thinks!)

The puppy’s new mom does all the things other parents do. She plays with him, takes care of him, and sometimes even makes him mad! But that’s okay, because when he’s feeling sad, she knows just what to say.

Adoption is complicated sometimes, but talking about it always helps.

One of the things I liked the most about this book was that the main character was old enough to understand what was happening when he was moved to a new home. Most adoption stories talk about infants, not older children who can have conversations about all of the changes in their lives and feel complex emotions about their new parent or parents.

I would have like to see more development of the plot. There were a few fascinating references to other animals staring unkindly at this unconventional family and to the puppy wishing his fur was the same color as his mom’s fur. Both of these issues would be great topics for exploring what it means to be a family and why some children aren’t the same race as their foster or adoptive parents, so I was surprised by the fact that the author didn’t spend more time showing how these things affected the puppy and how he learned to adjust to his new home.

The cat was such a nurturing parent to her son. She always reassured the puppy when he had questions about the differences between them or when he needed to know that her love for him was unconditional. Honestly, I couldn’t think of a better parent for this shy little puppy. She did a wonderful job of helping him to adjust to his new family and react appropriately to anyone who didn’t understand how a dog could call a cat his mother.

I’d recommend My New Mom & Me to anyone who is part of a family that stands out in a crowd for any reason.

A Hippy-Hoppy Toad by Peggy Archer


A Hippy-Hoppy Toad by Peggy Archer
Publisher: Schwartz & Wade
Genre: Childrens, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (40 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

From the illustrator of the award-winning Sophie’s Squash comes a rollicking read-aloud featuring a very tiny toad who gets displaced as animals–and humans–brush past him on the road.

In the middle of a puddle
in the middle of a road
on a teeter-totter twig
sat a teeny-tiny toad.
Snap! went the twig!
Up went the toad!
And he landed on a tree
by the side of the road.

It’s hard to be a tiny toad minding your own business on a twig. First a bird pecks at him. . . . Then a bee buzzes. . . . Then a dog barks . . . and so on. And each time the toad is surprised by a buzz or a woof (or the toe of a sneaker!), he hops to a new location farther down the road. With fun sounds, clever rhymes, and an irresistible rhythm, this is the perfect story for sharing one-on-one or in a group.

Anything can happen to tiny toads who climb onto sticks that can’t support their weight.

All of the plants and animals in this ecosystem lived in perfect harmony. Until the toad began accidentally flying through the air, their patch of land was a peaceful and quiet place for everyone to live. The fact that the toad honestly never meant to disrupt any of the things his neighbors were doing only made me more curious to see what kind of mischief he might find himself in next.

I wish that this tale had explained why the twig in the opening scene snapped. That action set all of the frog’s future adventures into motion, so it was surprising to me to see it happen without any explanation as to why it occurred. If it had included an explanation, I would have given it a much higher rating. Everything else about it was catchy and worth reading over and over again.

The rhymes were seriously adorable. I especially liked the section that talked about the tiny toad tumbling to a flower in the park by the road. The imagery in that line made me giggle with joy, and I liked the way the author rhymed common words together like that while still finding a creative way to fit everything into her tale. It was even more fun to read out loud than it was to read silently to myself.

A Hippy-Hoppy Toad should be read by anyone who likes stories that are full of friendly rhymes.

Black Panther Little Golden Book by Frank Berrios


Black Panther Little Golden Book by Frank Berrios
Publisher: Golden Books
Genre: Childrens, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (24 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

Marvel’s Black Panther springs to life in his first ever action-packed Little Golden Book!

Meet Marvel’s Black Panther! As an Avenger, this super hero uses his strength, speed, and unbreakable claws to pounce evil-doers! Boys and girls ages 2-5 will love this action-packed Little Golden Book as they learn about the Black Panther–from his Wakandan origins to his powers as well as his friends and foes.

Whether you’re visiting Wakanda again or for the first time, now is always the right moment to explore it.

My favorite scene was the one that showed how Black Panther rescued innocent people who were in danger as a result of the dangerous decisions his antagonists made. One of the reasons why I like this superhero so much has to do with how hard he works to save everyone who crosses his path even if he has to put himself in serious danger to do it. That’s an admirable thing to do, and it was explored well in this storybook.

I would have liked to see more time being spent developing the plot of this story. It did an excellent job of describing who Black Panther was and why he was so powerful, but there wasn’t a lot of energy being devoted to giving this character a villain to fight or a problem to solve. I started reading with the assumption that I’d love this tale just like I loved the film, so it was disappointing to have so little substance to work with.

The best section was the one that described where Black Panther’s abilities came from. They weren’t something he was born with or developed after being bitten by a radioactive spider, so finding out that piece of his past was a little more involved than it would be for some of the other super heroes out there.

Black Panther Little Golden Book is a thorough introduction to this superhero for readers who don’t know anything about him at all.

Small Saul by Ashley Spires


Small Saul by Ashley Spires
Publisher: Kids Can Press
Genre: Childrens, Action/Adventure, Historical
Length: Short Story (32 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 4 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

From the creator of Binky the Space Cat, a hilarious story about an unconventional little pirate.

Ahoy there! Will this sweet little pirate find his place aboard The Rusty Squid or will he be forced to walk the plank?

When Small Saul joins the crew of The Rusty Squid, it doesn’t take long for the other pirates to notice something is very different about this tiny fellow. He was born to sing sea shanties, bake pineapple upside down cakes and redecorate, not to hold a sword and plunder. Being rough and tough just isn’t in his nature.

Small Saul learned at Pirate College that pirates only care about three things: their ship, being tough and lots and lots of treasure. Can Small Saul show these ruffians that despite his gentle spirit, he’s worth his weight in gold? With treasure chests of laughs, Small Saul’s high-seas adventure is a light-hearted celebration of individuality, perseverance and being true to one’s self.

If you’ve ever struggled to fit in, keep reading.

This story had so much compassion for kids who have quirky personalities or interests. Small Saul was far more interested in cooking delicious food than he was in being aggressive, and that was only one of the many ways in which he was nothing at all like his peers. I loved seeing the friendly way the narrator treated this character and, by extension, all of the young kids hearing this tale who had their own special ways of relating to the world. There is enough room in the world for every type of personality to flourish, and Ms. Spires did a very good job at making Saul a relatable and wonderful role model for his audience.

I would have liked to see a little more attention paid to why Saul decided to be a pirate in the first place. While the plot did briefly talk about why this character picked a job that was so wildly different from his interests in life, I was surprised by how many other aquatic careers that might have suited him better weren’t even considered when Saul was deciding what he wanted to do with his life. With that being said, this was a minor criticism of a tale that I enjoyed quite a bit.

Some of my favorite scenes were the ones that showed the humorous side of being an unconventional pirate. Saul’s shipmates seriously didn’t know what to make of him when he first began sailing with them. He was a kind, sensitive guy who didn’t care about sword fights or stealing treasure. They were stereotypical pirates in every way, from their stinky living quarters to their obsession with becoming wealthy one day. The sharp contrast between him and them lead to several funny moments that made me giggle out loud.

Small Saul should be read by people of all ages who love pirates or who dance to the beat of their own drum.

Larf by Ashley Spires


Larf by Ashley Spires
Publisher: Kids Can Press
Genre: Childrens, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (32 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3.5 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

No one believes Larf exists, and he likes it that way. Larf, you see, is a sasquatch, the only sasquatch in the world (or so it seems). He has a very pleasant, and very private, life in the woods, where on any given day he might be found jogging, gardening or walking Eric, his pet bunny. But everything changes one morning when Larf discovers that another sasquatch is scheduled to make an appearance in the nearby city of Hunderfitz. What?! That must mean he’s not the only sasquatch in the world!

Excited by the prospect of having a friend to share hair grooming tips with (and let’s face it, teeter-tottering alone is no fun), Larf disguises himself as a city slicker and heads for Hunderfitz — where he’s in for a couple enormous surprises.

Ashley Spires once again shows her chops for creating irresistible, quirky characters and laugh-aloud stories and illustrations. Readers with little feet and big feet will fall head over heels for Larf.

Even sasquatches get lonely sometimes.

Larf was a such a lovable character. His anxiety about possibly meeting another member of his kind was completely understandable. Seeing him worry about what other members of his kind would be like also made it easy to empathize with him. I wanted nothing more than for him to have a good time and for all of his concerns to turn out to not be true after all.

The only thing I didn’t like about this story was its ending. While the beginning and middle were written nicely, the final scene didn’t give me the sense of closure I was hoping to get from it. It simply happened and then left me wondering what the characters might have done next. It would have been nice to either stretch that scene out by another page or spend more time building up to it earlier on in the plot.

I’ve been interested in sasquatches for almost as long as I can remember. Ms. Spires’ theories about what these creatures are like were as adorable as they were imaginative. I really enjoyed seeing how she imagined what life would be like for Larf. His days in the forest were spent doing everything from caring for his pet rabbit to reading the newspaper. He was so human-like that I could totally understand why humans would want to see him for themselves.

Larf made me smile. I’d recommend it to anyone who has ever worried about the future.

Spare Dog Parts by Alison Hughes


Spare Dog Parts by Alison Hughes
Publisher: Orca Book Publishers
Genre: Childrens, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (32 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3.5 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

A stumpy tail, mismatched paws, a long, drooly snout and the biggest dog heart that ever beat. In a celebration of what makes a pet unique, a little girl imagines how an odd assortment of parts combined to make the perfect dog.

With spare, inviting text from Alison Hughes and charmingly offbeat illustrations by award-winning illustrator Ashley Spires, this gorgeous picture book is sure to be an instant classic.

Mixed-breed dogs need love, too!

Some of the best scenes were the ones that showed how the main character’s dog reacted to her when she was feeling many different kinds of emotions. Her pet obviously cared about her quite a bit. His emotions often matched hers no matter if she was happy or sad. That special relationship between a kid and their dog is like nothing else on Earth, and it was described well in this tale.

The main character’s descriptions of her dog in beginning of this book were a little too negative for my tastes. I especially didn’t like the way she talked about his “odd, tubby, stubby body” when she was first introducing him to the audience. There was also a scene later on when she said some unflattering things about his intelligence. Not every dog is going to be a traditionally cute and clever pet, but I never would have described any of my childhood dogs so harshly.

With that being said, the tone of the plot changed quite a bit as it progressed. Once the main character started talking about her dog’s sparkling personality, I perked up. She clearly loved him quite a bit, and it showed. They were best friends who spent as much time as possible together. Seeing her focus on all of the positive aspects of her pet later on was refreshing.

Spare Dog Parts should be read by anyone who has a dog who turned out to be perfect for them.

The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires


The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires
Publisher: Kids Can Press
Genre: Childrens, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (32 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 4 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

A little girl and her canine assistant set out to make the most magnificent thing. But after much hard work, the end result is not what the girl had in mind. Frustrated, she quits. Her assistant suggests a long walk, and as they walk, it slowly becomes clear what the girl needs to do to succeed. A charming story that will give kids the most magnificent thing: perspective!

Everyone feels the urge to give up sometimes. Keep reading to find out why they shouldn’t give into that desire.

The main character of this story was such a persistent and inventive kid. I loved seeing her tinker with her invention as she tried to figure out what worked well on it and what could still use some improvement. One of the coolest parts of her journey was that she didn’t figure it all out immediately. It took what was often a frustrating amount of time for her to test all of her ideas, and yet she refused to give up no matter how many times she failed. This was such a great example for kids and adults alike.

This is a minor criticism of a story I otherwise enjoyed a lot, but I found myself wishing that the main character’s name would have been shared at some point. It felt odd to get to know so much about her without ever knowing what I should call her. Even knowing a nickname for her would have been enough to give this tale a five star rating.

The relationship between the main character and her dog was so sweet. No matter was else was going on in her life, the main character always had time and energy for her dog. They shared a close connection, and I could tell how much they cared about each other by how they acted when they were together.

I’d heartily recommend The Most Magnificent Thing to inventors and amateur engineers of all ages.

Monsters Eat Whiny Children by Bruce Eric Kaplan


Monsters Eat Whiny Children by Bruce Eric Kaplan
Publisher: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers
Genre: Childrens, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Holiday, Horror, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (40 pages)
Age Recommendation: 6+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

Dad has warned Henry and Eve: If you whine too much, monsters will eat you. Henry and Eve don’t listen, of course. The only problem is, when the monster comes, he can’t find the right recipe for whiny children—and neither can his monster friends! A whiny child salad doesn’t work because there’s paprika in the dressing. A whiny child cake won’t do because the flour spills all over the floor. And whiny child burgers are out of the question because the grill is too hard to light up. Arguments and hilarity ensue. And just when our persnickety monsters decide on the perfect dish…the worst thing of all happens….

Sometimes deciding what to make for dinner is the hardest part of the day. This is true even for monster who are planning to turn human children into the main ingredient of it.

The premise of this tale caught my attention immediately. I’ve always loved children’s fiction that has a dark side, especially if it includes the horror genre in a playful way. The best moments of Eve and Henry’s adventures were the ones that showed what can happen to kids who refuse to stop whining. Not only were they funny, they taught an important message about communicating your needs without whining.

Most of this jokes in this book seemed to be geared to adults instead of kids. For example, one of the monsters decided against baking the children into a cake because she was worried about her bottom being too large and she didn’t want to gain any more weight. This isn’t something that most children think about at all, so it was strange to me to see it included in something that was otherwise written for them.

All of the kitchen accidents made me giggle. Cooking, baking, or grilling a delicious dinner isn’t always as easy as it may seem. It turned out that monsters are no better at any of this stuff than the average person is, so there were plenty of mishaps along the way as they decided how they should prepare the human children they’d just caught.

Monsters Eat Whiny Children is a good choice for anyone who loves snarky fiction.

When the World Is Full of Friends by Gillian Shields


When the World Is Full of Friends by Gillian Shields
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens Books
Genre: Childrens, Historical
Length: Short Story (32 pages)
Age Recommendation: 3+
Rating: 3 Stars
Review by: Astilbe

When the world
is full of friends,
the fun and laughter
never ends.

Albert, Tom, Flossie, and Pipkin love to play. And while they have fun inventing games together, their biggest wish is to have friends to share them with. One day, something magical happens. A family of squirrels moves in across the stream! They could be the perfect friends–but how will they cross the stream?

With a little help from Father Rabbit, Albert, Tom, Flossie, and Pipkin will discover just how wonderful it is when the world is full of friends. This touching story from the revered team behind When the World Is Ready for Bed and When the World Was Waiting for You will warm the hearts of readers young and old.

Sometimes you have to put some effort into making a new friend.

Making new friends definitely isn’t always as easy as it seems, especially when it requires solving a problem first. I liked the fact that Albert and his siblings had to plan ahead of time how they might accomplish their goal and then work together to try to achieve it. That’s a good message to share with this age group, and all of these rabbits were excellent role models.

The plot was a little thin. While I was expecting a sweet and gentle tale that was meant for a young and sensitive audience, I would have liked to see the rabbit family work harder to figure out how to cross the stream so they could meet their new friends. There simply wasn’t enough conflict as it was written to keep me interested in reading. Even one more attempt at solving that problem would have been enough for me to choose a much higher rating.

Albert and his family were so cooperative with each other. I enjoyed seeing them brainstorm possible ways to cross the stream safely as a group. They listened to each other nicely and took everyone’s opinions into consideration before they tried one of their ideas. I also appreciated the fact that they explained why some ideas might work better than other ones. Their reasoning made sense, and it also helped me keep reading until the end.

When the World Is Full of Friends would make a peaceful bedtime story.